Comics & Things

A tumblr for comics-related blather (and other things).

I used to do stuff like this for a living... but then I got a real job. Then I kind of missed it a little...

Five clips from five separate panels of X.

You don’t see this as often as you should … genuinely expressive pencils that instantly get you as pissed off as the character you’re reading about. You feel what she feels.

Leigh is character who rocks a fierce kind of nerd, and she’s anything but passive. As such, it’s good to see an artist (Robert Atkins) who knows how to make the most of her more subtle, inimitable behaviors.

Leigh is an emotional character, but she’s not hysterical. It’s likewise important to note that she’s a journalist, someone whose intelligence and knack for knowing when something just doesn’t smell right often bleeds through when she gets all worked up. Articulating these personality cues with a hunch of the shoulders, a flick of the wrist, or a teasing half-smile thus becomes critical to understanding her story.

(from X #14)


COVER A: Art by Steve Cummings and Ross A. CampbellCOVER B: Alina UrusovCOVER C: Jeff COVER D: Adam Warren and John RauchCOVER E: Kalman AndrasofszkyCOVER F: Erik Larsen and John RauchCOVER G: Steve Cummings and Tamra BonvillainCOVER H: Steve Cummings and Tamra BonvillainCOVER I: Chip ZdarskyCOVER J: Steve Cummings and Tamra Bonvillain

All ten covers for Wayward #1.

A: Steve Cummings and Ross A. Campbell
B: Alina Urusov
C: Jeff “Chamba” Cruz
D: Adam Warren and John Rauch
E: Kalman Andrasofszky
F: Erik Larsen and John Rauch
G: Steve Cummings and Tamra Bonvillain
H: Steve Cummings and Tamra Bonvillain
I: Chip Zdarsky
J: Steve Cummings and Tamra Bonvillain

Jim Zub, Steve Cummings, and John Rauch’s Wayward hits shelves this week. Rori (“an outsider left to her own devices”) has the red hair, Ayane (“a whimsically violent girl”) the blue. Cute, right?

Let’s go demon hunting in Japan. Just you and me.


They key to 'Millennium Actress' title card.The film begins. Chiyoko runs to the storehouse.  Pursuit/running is a recurring thread in the film's mosaic.Filmic memory. Chiyoko runs to her beloved, in film or in reality? Both?Stopped and questioned by the police. In film or in reality? Both? Again?As an adult, Chiyoko finds respite from work . . . will she also find happiness?Long-delayed letter from the man she once pursued.She reads the letter.Modern-day Chiyoko Fujiwara.The key that started it all.

Anime director Satoshi Kon passed away four years ago today. These are ten screenshots from 千年女優 Millennium Actress, one of his films and a personal favorite of mine. The following is excerpted from an obit I published on Mr. Kon after his initial passing:

Kon’s oeuvre resides in a small, tightly bound cluster of the cartoon universe where every image, every sensation, and every experience occurs under the dimly lit halo of shared perception. Although his influence over aspiring directors and screenwriters cannot be measured in such a short time, it nevertheless goes without saying Satoshi Kon’s creative idiosyncrasies are likely to reverberate in the efforts of future anime entrepreneurs who dare dabble in all varieties of magical realism, the supernatural, and psychological self-awareness. […]

Millennium Actress follows a kind-hearted filmmaker and his assistant as they interview an aging and somewhat reclusive actress, Chiyoko Fujiwara. In his observations, documentarian Genya Tachibana relives and experiences Chiyoko’s personal history. The man and his assistant literally weave in and out of her memories, standing on set at her film rehearsals, sitting in jail with her during her political imprisonment, and running with her to the train station in search of the man she thought she loved. Chiyoko spent much of her life chasing a lover who was never hers, and so teaches viewers the importance of recognizing those once-rational phantoms in life that can paralyze our emotions. Millennium Actress successfully canvasses the history of Japanese film, Japanese politics, and in Chiyoko’s case, personal growth, in the search for personal identity — assuming it is to be found at all.

Millennium Actress reflects what Kon would later articulate as the “quivering identity” of the Japanese; a sort of sentimental bilocation that might prevent an individual from discerning a more uncertain state of being brought on by multiple experiences.


"With feelings of gratitude for all that is good in this world, I put down my pen.

"Well, I’ll be leaving now."
—Satoshi Kon (October 12, 1963 - August 24, 2010)
Full confession: I’ve done that to somebody before.

Had something of mine broken.

Had my pride broken.

Made me feel like my whole world was broken.

And, subsequently being a kid, forgetting that you’re just a kid, and have nothing to call your own but your anger and your rage and your fists.

You never walk away with your head held high.

You never walk away feeling better about yourself.

"There are no happy trails."

(from Translucid #3)

Full confession: I’ve done that to somebody before.

Had something of mine broken.

Had my pride broken.

Made me feel like my whole world was broken.

And, subsequently being a kid, forgetting that you’re just a kid, and have nothing to call your own but your anger and your rage and your fists.

You never walk away with your head held high.

You never walk away feeling better about yourself.

"There are no happy trails."

(from Translucid #3)