Comics & Things

A tumblr for comics-related blather (and other things).

I used to do stuff like this for a living... but then I got a real job. Then I kind of missed it a little...

From the short comic, “The Sting of Death!” — appearing in Thrilling Adventure Stories #1, 1975).

A plane explodes over the African jungle and only six people survive. Among them is a soldier-of-fortune, attempting to lead them to survival. 

The group must fend off a bunch of ravenous cannibals, which, my instincts nudged me, was kinda racist and so forth. But then I hit the last page of the comic, and something interesting happened…

From the short comic, “The Sting of Death!” — appearing in Thrilling Adventure Stories #1, 1975).

A plane explodes over the African jungle and only six people survive. Among them is a soldier-of-fortune, attempting to lead them to survival.

The group must fend off a bunch of ravenous cannibals, which, my instincts nudged me, was kinda racist and so forth. But then I hit the last page of the comic, and something interesting happened…


A rather beautiful promotional poster for the upcoming Korean TV drama 최고의 결혼 Greatest Wedding, which focuses on the social drama surrounding the “Miss Mom” identity. That is, of highly educated and economically independent women who willingly enter motherhood away from marriage. 

The series tracks a handful of couples but generally centers on a character played by actress 박시연 Park Si-yeon — a successful television reporter (차기영 Cha Gi-yeong) who recently had artificial insemination. Must she get married, too? Questions regarding women’s social experience (expectations) in a patriarchal society, and whether Miss Cha’s livelihood represents or reflects a new “social status of women today,” will certainly abound. 

This poster is rather extraordinary for the way it inverts what is a typical over-the-shoulder model shot. Only, this isn’t a model shot. She’s not trying to look like a model. She’s not being sexy. She’s not a temptress. She’s breastfeeding. 

(I imagine Vaughan and Staples, the folks behind the indubitably successful Saga, would approve handily.)

The selection of Park Si-yeon as the lead is also intriguing. 최고의 결혼 Greatest Wedding is her return to television drama following real-life drama: namely, a suspension, fine, and probation stemming from a 2013 indictment for the illegal use of the drug propofol. Ms. Park also returns to television as her newborn reaches one year old. To wit, the parallels of a woman who maintains her career as well as her family in the face of recurring challenges and/or social stigma are hard to miss. 

최고의 결혼 Greatest Wedding isn’t the first K drama to tackle Miss Moms — not by a long shot — but since childbirth out of wedlock is so uncommon in Korea (roughly 2%), and because it is generally much more difficult to advocate for single motherhood given the negative connotations, the TV series’ premise has merit. How difficult is unwed motherhood in South Korea? Well, I don’t live in South Korea. But there are an array of not uncommon reports of unwed women in their twenties, thirties, and even forties who are stigmatized by family and friends, pressured into international adoption, pressured to leave work, and find their children discriminated against at school. Induced abortions are illegal but do occur; but since reporting is not mandatory, statistics/tracking vary (the Ministry for Health, Welfare, and Family Affairs would argue otherwise…). 

Not to say that there aren’t advocacy groups or that women aren’t pushing back. Support networks have sprouted up in recent years. My favorite response comes from a 43-year-old woman whom, after being left by her boyfriend, was fearless: “I wanted a kid more than a husband.” 

Hmmm… this posted ended up being a lot longer than I thought it would.

Network: TV Chosun
Air Date: 09/27/2014

A rather beautiful promotional poster for the upcoming Korean TV drama 최고의 결혼 Greatest Wedding, which focuses on the social drama surrounding the “Miss Mom” identity. That is, of highly educated and economically independent women who willingly enter motherhood away from marriage.

The series tracks a handful of couples but generally centers on a character played by actress 박시연 Park Si-yeon — a successful television reporter (차기영 Cha Gi-yeong) who recently had artificial insemination. Must she get married, too? Questions regarding women’s social experience (expectations) in a patriarchal society, and whether Miss Cha’s livelihood represents or reflects a new “social status of women today,” will certainly abound.

This poster is rather extraordinary for the way it inverts what is a typical over-the-shoulder model shot. Only, this isn’t a model shot. She’s not trying to look like a model. She’s not being sexy. She’s not a temptress. She’s breastfeeding.

(I imagine Vaughan and Staples, the folks behind the indubitably successful Saga, would approve handily.)

The selection of Park Si-yeon as the lead is also intriguing. 최고의 결혼 Greatest Wedding is her return to television drama following real-life drama: namely, a suspension, fine, and probation stemming from a 2013 indictment for the illegal use of the drug propofol. Ms. Park also returns to television as her newborn reaches one year old. To wit, the parallels of a woman who maintains her career as well as her family in the face of recurring challenges and/or social stigma are hard to miss.

최고의 결혼 Greatest Wedding isn’t the first K drama to tackle Miss Moms — not by a long shot — but since childbirth out of wedlock is so uncommon in Korea (roughly 2%), and because it is generally much more difficult to advocate for single motherhood given the negative connotations, the TV series’ premise has merit. How difficult is unwed motherhood in South Korea? Well, I don’t live in South Korea. But there are an array of not uncommon reports of unwed women in their twenties, thirties, and even forties who are stigmatized by family and friends, pressured into international adoption, pressured to leave work, and find their children discriminated against at school. Induced abortions are illegal but do occur; but since reporting is not mandatory, statistics/tracking vary (the Ministry for Health, Welfare, and Family Affairs would argue otherwise…).

Not to say that there aren’t advocacy groups or that women aren’t pushing back. Support networks have sprouted up in recent years. My favorite response comes from a 43-year-old woman whom, after being left by her boyfriend, was fearless: “I wanted a kid more than a husband.”

Hmmm… this posted ended up being a lot longer than I thought it would.

Network: TV Chosun

Air Date: 09/27/2014